Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Importance of Intentional Communities with Stacy Kozakavich

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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We explore the concept of intentional or “utopian” or “communal” communities throughout North America. Intentional communities include the Shakers, the Harmony Society, The Oneida community, Brook Farm, the Moravians, the Kawah Colony, and Mormon towns.

We visit with Stacy Kozakavich, the author of a new book by University Press of Florida, The Archaeology of Utopian and Intentional Communities, and ask her about her inspiration for the book, the role intentional communities have taken in shaping North America, and why they continue to be important in society.

As a thank you to our listeners, we have included a discount link for the book, direct from the publisher! Follow this link and use code: WA18 at checkout.

http://upress.ufl.edu/book.asp?id=9780813056593

 

Book Review: Introducing Postmodernism By Appignanesi and Garratt

Theory in any discipline can be extremely difficult to grasp.  Bring in postmodernism and many students are completely lost.  This book helped me understand the postmodernism movement when I was first introduced to historical and archaeological theory.  Appignanesi and Garratt answer such questions as, what on earth is false postmodernism?  Eclectic postmodernism?  The Anthropic Principle?  Introducing Postmodernism is a great companion to any theoretical textbook/compilation of works for an undergraduate theory class.  I found myself pulling out this book even for my graduate anthropology theory class.

Through cartoons and brief but concise explanations, the authors trace the complexities of the postmodernist movement in art, theory, science, and history.  Reading original texts by Derrida and Levi-Strauss can bring on massive headaches—this book, however, breaks down such authors’ concepts into something understandable.  After reading about major postmodernists and their thoughts brought to life via drawings, I was then able to tackle some of their writing.  Although, Derrida still has me scratching my head.

Textbook Review of ‘The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome’ by Chris Scarre

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If you need the entire history of the Roman Empire reduced into a nutshell, with fantastic maps and photographs of archaeological ruins and busts, then this is the book for you!  The history of Roman civilization is a huge topic to tackle, especially in the span of a semester.  As a Classics minor, I had a difficult time remembering the major dates, people, and places figuring from 800 BC to 540 AD, from the origins in Rome, to fall of the Western Empire.  The Atlas provides a visual depiction of the rise and fall of Rome.  I personally like being able to see a broad depiction in order to better understand the major themes of a civilization.  Scarre provides detailed maps of important places of expansion, as well as information on trade, literacy, and cultural life in different periods.  The timelines are excellent; the timeline is broken down into The Roman State, Building and Construction, Literature and Philosophy, and Asia, Africa, and the Mediterranean.  This book, however, cannot stand alone since it is a broad overview.  It is a great companion to classical texts and textbooks on the Roman Empire.  It is also perfect for a quick overview before an exam.  For those simply interested the rise and fall of Rome, the Atlas provides a great overview with fantastic images.