Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Importance of Intentional Communities with Stacy Kozakavich

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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We explore the concept of intentional or “utopian” or “communal” communities throughout North America. Intentional communities include the Shakers, the Harmony Society, The Oneida community, Brook Farm, the Moravians, the Kawah Colony, and Mormon towns.

We visit with Stacy Kozakavich, the author of a new book by University Press of Florida, The Archaeology of Utopian and Intentional Communities, and ask her about her inspiration for the book, the role intentional communities have taken in shaping North America, and why they continue to be important in society.

As a thank you to our listeners, we have included a discount link for the book, direct from the publisher! Follow this link and use code: WA18 at checkout.

http://upress.ufl.edu/book.asp?id=9780813056593

 

Women in Archaeology Podcast: History of Badass Women in Archaeology, Part II (Episode 46)

You can listen to the podcast on the Archaeology Podcast Network (Click Here), or download the episode on iTunes.

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On this episode, the hosts return to one of their favorite topics – the amazing women who have helped make archaeology the field it is. We’ll talk about some of our personal heroes, women who definitely don’t get enough credit, and how archaeological drawing is super hard and becoming somewhat of a lost art.

Check out the Women in Archaeology blog!

https://womeninarchaeology.wordpress.com/

Women in Archaeology Podcast: Zooarchaeology with Alex Fitzpatrick

You can listen to the episode, here, on the Archaeology Podcast Network or download the episode from iTunes.

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Do they have squirrels in Scotland? Maybe you enjoy in depth discussions about ancient ceramics. In today’s episode we discuss one of the myriad of sub-fields within archaeology, with zooarchaeologist Alex Fitzpatrick. We cover what is zooarchaeology (in short animal bones), how it has been used to learn about humans and the world in the the past, and some of the projects she works on. We also discuss some of Alex’s work on various science communication projects.

Check out the WIA Blog!

https://womeninarchaeology.wordpress.com/

Women in Archaeology Podcast: Archaeology and Climate Change in Kiribati

Click here to listen to the episode on the Archaeology Podcast Network (APN)!  You can also download the episode form iTunes.

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Climate change is impacting archaeological sites at an alarming rate, and more importantly, the lives of people around the globe. We’re joined by Mike Roman to discuss how climate change is impacting Kiribati, the social impact of loosing heritage sites, and some suggestions for how people can get involved in combating climate change.

Check out the WIA Blog!

https://womeninarchaeology.wordpress.com/

Women in Archaeology: State of the Monuments

Click Here to listen to the episode on the Archaeology Podcast Network! You can also download the episode from iTunes.

-1The Bears Ears and Escalante National Monuments were recently reduced in size by the present administration. Chelsi, Emily, Kirsten, and Jessica discuss the action and its impacts on local populations and archaeology.

Check out the Women in Archaeology Podcast website: https://womeninarchaeology.wordpress.com/

Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Period Episode

Click Here to listen to the episode on the Archaeology Podcast Network website.  You can also download the episode from iTunes.

-1On this episode we discuss PERIODS!! A lot of us have them, they can be really inconvenient, and dealing with them in the field is often less straightforward than normal. We discuss pros and cons of the various products on the market, how to deal with that ‘oops’ moment, and suggestions for making your life easier when you’re on your period.

Check out the Women in Archaeology Podcast website: https://womeninarchaeology.wordpress.com/

A Brief History of the Antiquities Act of 1906

Click Here to listen to the ARCH365 episode on this topic through the Archaeology Podcast Network. You can also download the episode from iTunes.

There’s quite a bit of history that led up to the creation and implementation of the Antiquities Act, starting with the general interest of the American people in the past. While president of the American Philosophical Society, Thomas Jefferson asked the organization to record antiquities before such artifacts were lost to future generations. Examples of both government and civic preservation include the protection of ancient earthen mounds throughout the Midwest (Schroeder 2009:172). The Ohio Company designated ancient mounds and earthworks in Ohio as important public places for preservation. However, unlike modern legislation in cultural resource management, government intervention was minimal until the 19th century, when pressure was placed on the government by the concerned public over destroyed historic and prehistoric ruins.

By the mid-19th century, Americans were keen on historic preservation efforts. This effort was rooted in the need to preserve what civic leaders and middle-class professionals considered to be traditional American beliefs and cultural values. Groups like Sons of the American Revolution and Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities hoped to create a sort of shrine to the past, idealizing of the nation’s founding fathers and influential sites from the American Revolution (Durel 1986:230). Historic houses, such as George Washington’s home of Mt. Vernon, provided a window into the past, demonstrating a need for continued preservation of historic places and a place presenting history to the public.

Three major exhibitions brought Native American antiquities to the forefront: the Columbian Historical Exposition of 1892 in Madrid, Spain, the World’s Columbian Exposition, also known as the Chicago World’s fair, of 1893 in Chicago and the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, also known as the St. Lous Worlds Fair, in St. Louis, Missouri. These exhibitions displayed the material remains of recently excavated regions of the American Southwest. The display of Indian antiquities romanticized the American west and generated a demand for Indian antiquities and art. Growing interest in archaeological materials led to looting of major sites in the American southwest such as the Mesa Verde Cliff dwellings in Colorado (Hutt et al. 1992:19). Railroad construction during the mid to late 19th century, allowed for the long-distance shipping of large fragile collections of archaeological remains—making it easier to send hundreds of thousands of artifacts across the united states.

Public concern with the destruction of antiquities and the growing professionalization of anthropology created a role for the government to step into. For example, in 1892, supporters of preservation sent congress petitions to protect and preserve Casa Grande, a prehistoric structure in southern Arizona. It became the first site to be protected by the feds. The need for federal legislation was brought to the forefront by archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewett. Knowing key members of Congress and professional societies, Hewett was appointed a member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to work towards creating antiquities legislation (Thompson 2000:236). Hewett’s work the AAA helped establish the language of the Antiquities of 1906 and the groundwork for future cultural resource management legislation.

President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act, on June 8, 1906, establishing a basic federal policy to protect and preserve cultural resources on public lands (Green 1998:123). The Antiquities Act created criminal sanctions to prosecute looters, the act allows the president to create historic scientific and national monuments, and the act established a permit system to examine and excavate archaeological sites on federal lands, meaning no work can be undertaken without a permit (Hutt et al. 1992:21). Consequently, the Antiquities Act protects “any historic or prehistoric ruin or monument, or any object of antiquity situated on lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States” (United States Congress 1906:1).

Without the antiquities act, archaeologists wouldn’t have the current legislation that backs-up our work and the public wouldn’t have the amazing national monuments like Bears Ears in Utah. The antiquities act is a crucial piece of cultural resource legislation in the United States, which shouldn’t be overlooked, overshadowed by economic incentives, or overturned by those who do not understand the importance or preserving and protecting the past for future generations.

Links:

-If you are interested in my cited sources, you can find the associated book on Google. Feel free to message me if you would like the full reference or suggestions on further reading.

-NPS: https://www.nps.gov/archeology/tools/laws/antact.htm

-Legislation: https://www.nps.gov/history/local-law/anti1906.htm