Women in Archaeology Podcast: Identity Archaeology with Chelsea Blackmore

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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Chelsea Blackmore joins us to discuss her work on identity, oppression, queer archaeology and outreach.  Dr. Blackmore is a professor at UC Santa Cruz whose primary work has focused on the construction of social difference in Mesoamerica, particularly among the Maya.  Some of her more recent work has included analysis of a Spanish Mission site in California and pirate archaeology.  We discuss how her interests developed, the need for better representation in archaeology, and the new Queer Archaeology Blog.

Show Notes:

https://queerarchaeology.com

TBD Podcast

SAA Archaeological Record Special Edition

SHA GMAC

http://queeranthro.org/

Find Chelsea and the Queer Archaeology team on:

https://queerarchaeology.com/contact-us/

@QueerArch on Twitter

https://www.facebook.com/QueerArch/

Women in Archaeology Podcast: Pseudoarchaeology with Stephanie

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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Today’s panel discusses the wild world of pseudo-archaeology. The regular panel is joined by Stephanie Halmhofer at Bones, Stones, and Books, and Sara Head from Archaeological Fantasies to discuss the nature of pseudo-archaeology, how to identify it, what to do when you see it, and how we as archaeologists can combat it.

Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Importance of Intentional Communities with Stacy Kozakavich

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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We explore the concept of intentional or “utopian” or “communal” communities throughout North America. Intentional communities include the Shakers, the Harmony Society, The Oneida community, Brook Farm, the Moravians, the Kawah Colony, and Mormon towns.

We visit with Stacy Kozakavich, the author of a new book by University Press of Florida, The Archaeology of Utopian and Intentional Communities, and ask her about her inspiration for the book, the role intentional communities have taken in shaping North America, and why they continue to be important in society.

As a thank you to our listeners, we have included a discount link for the book, direct from the publisher! Follow this link and use code: WA18 at checkout.

http://upress.ufl.edu/book.asp?id=9780813056593

 

Adventures in Rock Art: Canyon Pintado National Historic District

“Halfway down the canyon toward the south, there is a very high cliff on which we saw crudely painted three shields or chimales and the blade of a lance.  Farther down on the north side we saw another painting which crudely represented two men fighting.  For this reason we called this valley Cañon Pintado,” wrote Fray Escalante on September 9, 1776.  I read these words on an interpretive sign while walking a dusty trail to view some of these painted images.  It’s thought that Father Dominguez and Father Escalante observed a variety of Native American pecked and painted rock art in this canyon as they traveled through the Douglas Creek Valley.  This area is now a popular recreation site, where you can explore prehistoric and historic pictographs and petroglyphs.

This 16,000 acre area is listed as a National Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places as an important historic property in understanding our nation’s past.  The rock art panels represent several time periods and cultures.  There are panels that were created by the Fremont, dating between 800 to 1150 AD; these images include animals, anthropomorphic figures, and geometric symbols.  The Ute created images like bear paws, horses, and hunting scenes between 1200-1881 AD.  Historic rock art includes ranching symbols, buxom ladies, and horses.  As always, when visiting archaeological sites, keep in mind that these places are incredibly fragile and need to be visited with respect.

For More Information:

https://www.blm.gov/visit/canyon-pintado-national-historic-district

http://www.nomadcolorado.com/canyon-pintado-rock-art/

http://www.coloradolifemagazine.com/Canyon-Pintados-Rock-Art/