Women in Archaeology Podcast: Re-Release of ‘Badass Women in Archaeology’

Listen to the podcast on the Women in Archaeology Blog [Click Here] or listen to the podcast on iTunes!

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Join us in celebrating some amazing women in the history of the field!

Show Notes:

*50 Most Important Women in Science

Dig Ventures: Pioneering Women in Archaeology

Rejected Princesses: Zelia Nuttall

Trowel Blazers: see what they are doing in 2019 at the bottom of the page!

Archaeological Fantasies: Gertrude Bell

Book: Ladies of the Field by Amanda Adams

**featured image copied from the Gertrude Bell Archive [1] [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Shutdown

The Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Shutdown (Click Here to listen at Womeninarchaeology.com or download the episode from itunes)

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Join us as we take a closer look at what the shutdown means for archaeologists, public lands, and the consequences that will likely stretch into the rest of 2019.

Show Notes:

Government Contractors such as archaeologists

Human Waste Issues

Agency plans during shutdown: see how each agency is handling the shutdown and how you are affected.

How congress can trump Trump

Economic Effects

Book Review of ‘Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners’ by Therese Oneill

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There are those who yearn for the days when life was ‘simpler,’ the chance to flounce around in pretty dresses, running through fields of heather on a dusky moor to pine away for lost loves.  I’ve certainly fallen into that trap before, especially while watching (okay, re-watching) Pride and Prejudice, but all one needs to do is open a history book to realize that nostalgia is stupid.  And, if you’re going to read a history book, why not delve into one describing the almost unbelievable Victorian attitudes towards women?  Oneill’s delightful book rips the lacy veil from the Victorian era to highlight the ridiculous rules and concepts imposed on women.  For example, women were thought to be addicted to menstruating.  Seriously.  The book opens with an invitation and a warning: “I can take you there.  I can make the past so real it will bring tears to your eyes.”  Oh, she does.

There are rules that will make you laugh out loud to stories that will make you want to want to stomp your foot at the sheer stupidity of the past.  To be a woman in the nineteenth century must have been a constant ‘damned if you do, damned if you don’t’ kind of situation.  As an archaeologist, I want to know the nitty-gritty aspects of life, and Oneill does not disappoint when it comes to detail.  How on earth did women take care of business in 20 pounds of petticoats and lace?  Now I know.  And then there are all the details I did not necessarily need to know, but those facts are burned into my memory now.  I thoroughly enjoyed reading this delightful romp through the past—it will make you appreciate the small things in life, like flushing toilets, pads and tampons, modern medicine, and basic human rights.

Women in Archaeology Podcast: Identity Archaeology with Chelsea Blackmore

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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Chelsea Blackmore joins us to discuss her work on identity, oppression, queer archaeology and outreach.  Dr. Blackmore is a professor at UC Santa Cruz whose primary work has focused on the construction of social difference in Mesoamerica, particularly among the Maya.  Some of her more recent work has included analysis of a Spanish Mission site in California and pirate archaeology.  We discuss how her interests developed, the need for better representation in archaeology, and the new Queer Archaeology Blog.

Show Notes:

https://queerarchaeology.com

TBD Podcast

SAA Archaeological Record Special Edition

SHA GMAC

http://queeranthro.org/

Find Chelsea and the Queer Archaeology team on:

https://queerarchaeology.com/contact-us/

@QueerArch on Twitter

https://www.facebook.com/QueerArch/

Women in Archaeology Podcast: Pseudoarchaeology with Stephanie

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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Today’s panel discusses the wild world of pseudo-archaeology. The regular panel is joined by Stephanie Halmhofer at Bones, Stones, and Books, and Sara Head from Archaeological Fantasies to discuss the nature of pseudo-archaeology, how to identify it, what to do when you see it, and how we as archaeologists can combat it.

Women in Archaeology Podcast: The Importance of Intentional Communities with Stacy Kozakavich

I am a proud member of the Women in Archaeology Podcast and Blog!  We recently left the Archaeology Podcast Network to set out on our own and make new content.  Check out all of our older podcasts on the WIA website and on iTunes. You can listen to the podcast on iTunes as well!  Don’t forget to subscribe! Click Here to visit website and listen to the episode on the Women in Archaeology website.

On this episode . . .

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We explore the concept of intentional or “utopian” or “communal” communities throughout North America. Intentional communities include the Shakers, the Harmony Society, The Oneida community, Brook Farm, the Moravians, the Kawah Colony, and Mormon towns.

We visit with Stacy Kozakavich, the author of a new book by University Press of Florida, The Archaeology of Utopian and Intentional Communities, and ask her about her inspiration for the book, the role intentional communities have taken in shaping North America, and why they continue to be important in society.

As a thank you to our listeners, we have included a discount link for the book, direct from the publisher! Follow this link and use code: WA18 at checkout.

http://upress.ufl.edu/book.asp?id=9780813056593